Simple WiFi relay board (3)


In an earlier post, I discussed how to quickly  make  a one channel WiFi relay with a relay module an ESP8266-01 and some Dupont cables.
In a later post, I showed how to make a 4 channel WiFi relay with an ESP8266-01 and a 4 channel relay board.

Both posts were a consequence of 2 videos by Ralph Bacon, discussing his slightly disappointing adventures with 2 commercially available Wifi relay boards, based on an ESP8266-01.
Out of interest I bought one of those boards -knowing the shortcomings Ralph pointed out- that I presumed I could fix.

The board comes with an ESP8266-01s. It has a Reset button, which isn’t really useful. The GPIO0 drives the relay through a 7002 FET, GPIO2 drives an LED and TX and Rx are not connected to anything.

The crux of this board is that it is really designed for the ESP8266-01S, although it can be made to work with the regular ESP8266-01. The ESP8266-01S is a version that already has pull-ups on GPIO0 and GPIO2, albeit that one of those pullups is through an onboard  LED. The regular ESP8266-01 does not have these pull ups and the relay board  does not provide them.

The relay module uses only one pin, GPIO0. It is connected to the gate of a 2007 FET that switches the relay and that is exactly where the problem starts. During startup, the ESP needs GPIO0 to be HIGH, unless you want to go to flash mode, when it needs to be LOW.
But as the ESP8266-01S correctly pulls pin GPIO0 HIGH, the relay will immediately be activated at startup. Hence he designer added a pull down resistor. Due to the presence of the Pull up on GPIO0 on the ESP8266-01 board, that needed to be a very strong pull down resistor and a 2k resistor was chosen. But now the GPIO0 pin is pulled LOW at startup, putting it in flash mode.

There are some simple solutions for this:

  • remove the 2k resistor. However this will activate the relay at start up.
  • reroute the triggersignal to  come from pin GPIO1 (Tx) or GPIO3 (Rx) (but you still need to remove the 2k resistor)

The latter solution is fairly simpel because of the long PCB trace going from GPIO0 to the gate of the FET

 

 

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Simple WiFi relay board: a 4 channel DIY WiFi relay board (2)

Driving a 4 channel relay board with ESP8266-01 through MQTT


In a previous post I discussed making a WiFi relay inspired by the trouble  Ralph Bacon had with a single relayboard from Aliexpress. Given the fact that the Sonoff SV is relatively cheap (don’t forget the shipping cost though), and the WiFi relay at AliExpress even cheaper, it is a nickle and dime question whether it is wise to DIY such a project yourself. However, if you already have an unused ESP8266-01 and a relay lying around, basically all you need are some DuPont cables to connect the two (as shown in my previous post).

It becomes more interesting to use all 4 pins of an idle lying ESP8266-01 and add a 4 channel relay board.
The ESP8266-01 however is a bit particular with the pins it has,as two of the 4 I/O pins are the pins that need to be pulled HIGH on startup whereas the remaining two pins are the UART. Those UART pins can be used as GPIO, but the problem is that they do not know that, they need to be told that they are no longer UART but in fact GPIO. We do that with a special pinMode command (more about that later).

The relayboard I had in mind is a bit peculiar. I discussed the full workings of this board in an earlier post.

For now however suffice to say the inputs need an active LOW to  close the relays, while in rest, the inputs are HIGH.
That is in fact quite handy when using an ESP8266-01, as two of the 4 pins, GPIO0 and GPIO2, need to be pulled high on start-up, something this circuit actually does. It is necessary though to feed the board, including the optocoupler with 5Volt. The connections between the ESP8266-01 and the relay board are made as follows:

A reminder: the relayboard needs 5Volt and the ESP-01 needs 3.3Volt.  You could use an LDO like the AMS1117 3.3 to drop the 5Volt to 3.3 however,do not connect the two Vcc’s directly. Wait, let me emphasize that: DO NOT CONNECT THE Vcc OF THE ESP TO THE VCC OF THE RELAY BORD, JUST DONT!!!!

The full board
The ESP8266-01 adapter board

The program

For the program I followed the structure that is used by computourist with regard to the use of MQTT messages.
The idea behind that is that commands going from MQTT broker to the node are called ‘southbound’  (‘sb’), while the ones going to the broker (so usually the ‘ state’) are called ‘northbound’ (‘nb’). The specific functions in the node are addressed as numbered devices.
This has advantages and disadvantages. The disadvantage being that you get codes like: “home/sb/node01/dev17” rather than something like: “home/cmd/wifirelay/relay1“.
Also the handling of the incoming MQTT is bound to a specified length, so altering it needs to be done with some consideration.
The advantages are that the handling of the code is easier and in fact extending the code with more functions is fairly easy.
What happens in fact is that once a subscribed MQTT code comes in, it is stripped to a its last two digits. These digits define the function it fulfills.
The Payload can be “ON”, “OFF”, “READ”, or a number, depending on the function chosen. The “READ”  payload reads and returns the state of the specific function (‘device’)  that is being read. Some ‘devices’ -as for instance the IP number or the MAC address, can only be read and not ‘set’.

The full list of devices is as follows:
00 uptime: read uptime in minutes
01 interval: read/set transmission interval for push messages
02 RSSI: read WiFi signal strength
03 version: read software version
05 ACK: read/set acknowledge message after a ‘set’ request

10 IP: Read IP address
11 SSID: Read SSID
12 PW: Read Password

16 read/set relay1 output
17 read set relay2 output
18 read set relay3 output
19 read set relay4 output

92 error: tx only: device not supported
91 error: tx only: syntax error
99 wakeup: tx only: first message sent on node startup

As I mentioned earlier, the UART pins need to be told that they should behave like GPIO pins. That can be done with the statement:
pinMode(1,FUNCTION_3);
pinMode(3,FUNCTION_3);

However, this will not work when there are any hardware serial statements left (such as Serial.print, Serial.begin)
So in order to control the relays from e.g. OpenHAB, this is what you add to your itemsfile:

Switch rel1 "WiFi relay 1 [%s]" (GF_Corridor) { mqtt="[mosquitto:home/sb/node01/dev17:command:*:default]" }
Switch rel2 "WiFi relay 2 [%s]" (GF_Corridor) { mqtt="[mosquitto:home/sb/node01/dev18:command:*:default]" }
Switch rel3 "WiFi relay 3 [%s]" (GF_Corridor) { mqtt="[mosquitto:home/sb/node01/dev19:command:*:default]" }
Switch rel4 "WiFi relay 4 [%s]" (GF_Corridor) { mqtt="[mosquitto:home/sb/node01/dev16:command:*:default]" }

this will render the following menu:

The program can be downloaded here. FYI, I trimmed down an existing, bigger program of mine. I left a bit of code here and there that might not be of immediate use in this project, but may come in handy if you want to use the code on a Wemos.
Cost:

  • relayboard 1.80 euro
  • ESP8266-01 1.45 euro
  • 5 and 3.3Volt module 0.40ct

If you are using a different relay board that does not have it’s inputs pulled high in rest, then you need to add 10k pull-ups on GPIO 0 and GPIO2

Simple WiFi relay board: an overview (1)

https://github.com/RalphBacon/ESP8266-WiFi-Relay/blob/master/ESP8266_5v_RELAY_SETUP.inoIn his video nr 107 youtuber Ralph Bacon describes his ‘frustration’ with an ESP8266-01 based wireless relay he got from AliExpress.

Wifi relay with ESP8266-01 and STC15F104 microprocessor

His frustration is understandable as that particular module is needlessly complicated. It seems the ESP8266-01 is mainly there to make the WiFi connection, while the relay is triggered by yet another microprocessor, the STC15F104. Communication between the two is via the serial port of the ESP8266, as if the designers thought, how can we make this in the dumbest way possible.
If you want to use this relay, this is how to do it:

Set the serialport to 9600 with : Serial.begin(9600);

To enable the Relay send the proper command bytes to serial port:

const byte ReBufferON[] = {0xA0, 0x01, 0x01, 0xA2};
Serial.write(ReBufferON, sizeof(ReBufferON));

To disable the Relay send the following bytes to the serial port:
const byte reBufferOFF[] = {0xA0, 0x01, 0x00, 0xA1};
Serial.write(ReBufferON, sizeof(ReBufferOFF));

Apparently it willalso work with AT commands.

###

An even simpler board

The ‘simple’ relay board

In his follow up video # 110  Ralph describes another, simpler relay board (pictured), that also frustrated him as the manufacturer apparently had not included the necessary pull-up resistors on the Chip Enable and on GPIO0 and GPIO2. (Edit: this turned out not to be entirely true as the board comes with an ESP8266-01S that has the necessary pullups on board)

Both videos came in my focus again, when i discussed the ‘simpler’ board with a diy mate and frequent commenter. It is very cheap to buy and once you add the resistors (to make it start up correctly) factually you have a Sonoff SV.
Ofcourse the Sonoff SV is less than 5 Euro (plus shipping), as opposed to the ‘brandless’ relay board only costing some 2.60 euro, so you might as well get the real thing, but it opens some interesting perspectives, especially as I had most of the stuff laying around namely an ESP8266-01 a relay module and a 3.3Volt power module, all fairly cheap. Just a couple of DuPont cables to connect the three, and it should be fine. I know it is all nickles & dimes stuff but lets do a quick calculation.

Total 2.08 euro as opposed to 2.62 euro (in a nicer package), so not really cost effective to ‘DIY’  but if you have the stuff laying around, better to use it than for it gather dust. It also allows you to choose another pin than GPIO2 to drive the relay.
Ralph also offers a program to replace the existing firmware in the ESP8266, as well as a phone app (all found in the description of his video). Ofcourse it is also possible to replace the firmware with MQTT responsive firmware. For that you could e.g. use my Sonoff Touch program, albeit that in line 17, you have to change “TouchLED=12;”  to “TouchLED=2;

But why stop there? the ESP8266-01 has 4 I/O pins, if we ad a small 220->5V power module and a 4 channel relay board, we could make a sonoff 4ch. These cost about 22 Euro. So that would be more rewarding to build.
That however will be for part 2.

Flashing Sonoff Touch – No soldering

Although it is not really a big thing to solder an angled header in a SonOff Touch in order to reprogram it, one also has to solder a wire to the GPIO-0 pin of the ESP8285 chip as the SonOff Touch has no button that can be used to get it into flash mode.
I therefore wondered if it wouldn’t be possible to flash the Sonoff Touch without any soldering. Spoiler: yes it is possible, but you need some dexterity.
First open the Sonoff Touch. This is easiest done with cautiously prying a screwdriver on between the casing and the frontplate at the side.
once that is done you can see a small board that you can just pull-out.
On that board there are 4 in line holes that we need to connect an FTDI programmer to. On the bottom side of the board is also a 2×2 male header. That is the one that we just pulled out of its header in the housing. We are going to need that header a bit later as well.

indicated  the function of the 1×4 header in the image. You are going to need an FTDI to USB module  THAT YOU CAN SET TO 3.3 VOLT. You also will need a 1×4  straight pinheader and 4 female to female DuPont wires.
Now make the following connection between the 1×4 male header and the FTDI to USB connector:

header FTDI module
Ground Ground
Tx Rx
Rx Tx
Vcc Vcc

To make clear, if it already wasn’t, this is a connection to a loose, 4 pin male header.
The next thing you need is a female to male DuPont cable. Connect the female end to the ground connection on the 2×2 header.

Also, you need to identify GPIO0 on the ESP8285 chip:

 

For the final flashing you need a bit of dexterity but this is what you do:

  • Have your Arduino IDE available with the  required program loaded.
  • Under tools-boards choose the generic 8285 module
  • Flash size 1 Mbyte 16k SPIFFS
  • Make sure the FTDI module is not connected to the USB port of your computer.
  • Now press the 4 pin male header that is connected to your FTDI module in the proper holes. Make sure it is the right way around, so Ground connects to ground, Vcc to Vcc, Rx to Tx and Tx to Rx. If there is a bit of slack between the header and the holes. push against the pins with  the mouse of yr thumb or with your little finger, so it makes  poper connection.
  • Now take the male pin of the DuPont cable that you connected to the ground on the 2×2 pin header and push it against GPIO 0.
    Keep it in place with your thumb.
  • You still should have one hand free. Use that to push the FTDI module in the USB connection of your computer.
  • Once that is done, you can let go of the male pin pressed against GPIO0
  • In the IDE chose the right port and press ‘upload’.

That’s it.

So, what program should you upload to make the Sonof Touch work?
Of course there is Tasmota and many people are very happy with it. Truthfully, I found it cumbersome and couldn’t even compile it. Considering all we need to do is switch 1 pin, it shouldn’t be so hard to write something simple.
Given the fact that the Sonoff Touch will most likely disappear in the wall and you don’t want to have to take it out and flash it again, two things come in very handy in the program:

  • OTA (Over The Air) flashing
  • WiFiManager

The code also gives MQTT feedback about the

  • MAC
  • IP
  • Filename
  • SignalStrength

It can be downloaded here

Controlling a GPIO pin on a remote raspberry

In an earlier post I showed how one could address the raspberry GPIO pins from within OpenHab (or NodeRed for that matter). The only limitation here was that it was on a raspberry that also hosted OpenHAB.

What if you have a RaspberryPi whose pins you want to control from within OpenHab, while openHab is in fact operating from another machine?

In that case  MQTT seems the best option. I wrote a Python program that will do just that.
If you installed Jessie or Stretch, it comes already with Python 2.7 which is quite suitable for this goal.
You will need two libraries:

The lightweight MQTT client Eclipse Paho Mqtt: Here I describe how to install it, but you could also just do:
pip install paho-mqtt

The second one you need to install is the Rpi.GPIO library.
LadyAda gives a good explanation  how to do that, but it basically comes down to issuing the command:
sudo apt-get install python-dev python-rpi.gpio

The Python program itself is fairly simple, but there are a few things to point out
The Rpi.GPIO library has two modes to set up the pins. it has ‘BCM mode’ and ‘BOARD mode’
These two modes refer to the numbering of the pin.

The GPIO.BOARD option specifies that you are referring to the pins by the number of the pin in the plug – i.e the numbers printed on the board.

The GPIO.BCM option means that you are referring to the pins by the “Broadcom SOC channel” number, these are the numbers after “GPIO” that can be seen in the various pinout diagrams

If you are still a bit puzzled, you can try and issue “the gpio readall” command on your terminal and depending on the type of Raspberry you have, you may get outputs like this for the Rpi3:

or this one for the B+
You will also need to set the IP for your particular MQTT broker and need to change the topic according to your wishes.

The program currently switches one pin ON or OFF. it is not particularly hard to expand that for more than one pin. The working can be controlled by the gpio readall command (check in the column ‘V’ what the state of the pin is)

I saved the program in my home/pi directory. It can be started by
python mqttpublish2.py (or any other name you want to give it). It is best to have it start at boot-up
Output will look like this:
A slight word of warning: Python sees indents as part of the command structure. If after downloading my file you go change it, be careful not to mess up the indents.
Edit: In the mean time I expanded the program a bit, it now sends the state of the pin as a seperate topic. It also sends the IP nr, the program name and an ‘alive’ message on startup. It uses pin 18.

 

A battery fed MQTT weatherstation

(Note: if you consider building this… I am working on a similar station with a bare ESP12 and a BME280 for even better energy efficiency)

Weatherstations are a popular build for DIY-ers and with the ESP8266 WiFi capabilities that has become very easy.
Here I will present a simple weatherstation (DHT sensor BMP sensor for temperature, humidity and atmospheric pressure) that can be battery fed or mains fed.
It will send the info by MQTT and in order to save batteries, go to sleep most of the time.
Components needed are:

  • A wemos mini D1
  • A DHT11 or DHT22
  • A BMP280
  • A 100k resistor for the battery
  • A small switch or jumper
  • A LithiumIon charger module

Just a word for the wise… the Wemos D1 is not the best option to battery feed, as it has some peripheral components (such as the CH340 chip) that draw current. A better choice would be the bare ESP8266, but it is not for everybody to solder that.

The application has OTA. Using OTA together with deep sleep is always a bit of a tricky situation as you cannot do OTA when the ESP8266 is in deep sleep.
basically there are 3 solutions for that:

  1. Include a pause in which you can do OTA. Problem with that is that you would need some indication of when that pause starts (e.g. once the MQTT messages have come in). Another problem is that that pause in which the processor is not in deep sleep, it wil consume more energy.
  2. Make the deepsleep dependent on the state of a pin. With a jumper or Switch you could make one pin high or low and thus allow deepsleep or not.
  3. By having the software check on a seperate website whether or not there is an update for the software and then download that software. Obviously that requires some more organization and if the Wemos will do that check whenever it awakes, it will do that say every 15 minutes for something that may never happen.

Considering the above, Option 2 seemed the best, so I added a small switch to tell the software whether or not to go into deepsleep.

Software

The program once loaded (get it here) has several tabs in the IDE.
The main program “esp8266_weatherstation” is quite straightforward, it sets up all the usual parameters, variables and the sensors.
It reads the sensors and sends these via MQTT to a broker.
Once that is done, it goes into deepsleep, depending on two parameters:

  • the “FORCE_DEEPSLEEP” variable: if present there will be a 15 min deepsleep. If not set, the deepsleep will be determined by the battery voltage.
  • the state of the ‘SLEEPPIN (D6):  if LOW there will be deepsleep, if HIGH, there will be no deepsleep

If there is no deepsleep, a pause of 30 secs is added to avoid the MQTT messages being send in a frenzy.

You may be puzzled by the following code section:

float h = dht.readHumidity();
float t = dht.readTemperature();
delay(2000);
float h = dht.readHumidity();
float t = dht.readTemperature();

The reason for this is the response time of the DHT22. If you  start a reading, the results you get are from a reading that was started 2 secs before. Usually that is not an issue, but if you put the processor to sleep for 15 minutes, that first reading will give you 15 min old values. If that is not a problem, by all means remove the delay and second reading. It will not make a difference on your battery life as your  DHT22 is not put to sleep.
technically ofcourse it is possible to feed the DHT22 from one of the I/O pins and switch it off when not needed, but the DHT22 also needs a warm-up time of about 2 secs, so you would need to take that into account. No doubt that warm up time could be catered for with the delay(2000) command mentioned above.

The “OTA” section sets up the OTA function. As explained before, OTA and DEEPSLEEP is a bit of an uneasy combination. In order to use OTA, tou would need to put the switch on D6 in the right position (HIGH) and either reset  the WEMOS or wait till the next wake up. Mind you that when DEEPSLEEPing the OTA port  can disappear, but it should come back once the processor is out of DEEPSLEEP.

the “config.h” file defines some variables

the “webconnect” file connects to WiFi. If for some reason that connection cannot be made after 10 times trying, the processor is going back to sleep for 30 more seconds and then tries again.

Libraries

The libaries used are quite standard, with the exception of the PubSubClient library. This is not the well known PubSubclient library from Nick O’Leary, but a fork made by Ian Tester. The reason for using that one is that it is easier to send variables in the MQTT payload.
The DHT library is the DHT sensor Library from Adafruit. If you prefer another DHT library (there are many) you will probably only need to make minor changes.
The BMP280 library is also from Adafruit.

The sensors

DHT22

The DHT22 is the more accurate sibling of the DHT11, but both have a tendency of failure. generally the DHT22 needs a pull up resistor, but one can also use the internal pullup of the I/O pin for that.

There are two specification where the DHT11 is better than the DHT22. That’s the sampling rate which for the DHT11 is 1Hz or one reading every second, while the DHT22 sampling rate is 0,5Hz or one reading every two seconds and also the DHT11 has smaller body size.

If you are using this sensor outside, you can protect it against dirt and  creepy crawlies by covering it with a single layer of teflon tape. Supposedly this is fully permeable for humidity.

The DHT sensors do not have eternal life. they give up working alltogether (and usually permanently) when the humidity is 100%

Properties DHT11 DHT22
Voltage 3-5 Volt 3-5 Volt
Operating current 2.5mA 2.5mA
Temperature range 0 t/m 50 ºC -40 t/m 80 ºC
Temperature accuracy ±2 ºC ±0,5 ºC
Humidity range 20-80% RH 20-95% RH
Humidity accuracy ±5% RH ±2-5% RH
Sampling rate 1Hz 0.5Hz
BMP280

The BMP280 is the successor of the BMP085, BMP 180 and BMP183

Ofcourse it is possible to use one of the above predecessors, but these older sensors are generally more expensive than the BMP280.
The BMP280 can measure barometric pressure with ±1 hPa absolute accuraccy, and temperature with ±1.0°C accuracy. It can be controlled both by SPI and I2C.

Do not mix it up with the BME280. That sensor can also read humidity, but it is slightly more expensive.
The BME280 ofcourse would be a perfect chip to go to if you want to avoid the DHT22 sensor. It can read temperature, humidity and barometric pressure. I just didnt have it lying around, thus couldnt try.

If you are no fan of the DHT11/22 consider the I2C HTU21D, or theSi7021 (replaced by the HTU21D).
If you are only interested in say temperature and not in humidity, the BPM280 is the best choice and you can omit the DHT22. If you only want temperature, the DS18B20 is probably the best choice.

The battery

Lipo Charge module

It is hard to give recommendations for what battery to use. I am using the battery shield to which I connect a LiPo battery. That makes it all very simple but it is not the most efficient way of using the energy from a battery as the battery shield first boosts it up to 5 Volt after which the Wemos makes 3V3 Volt from it.
Another easy way is to use a Lipo battery with a lowdrop 3V3 regulator and a cheap charging module (pictured top). You could combine the charging module with a small solar cell (with a 5-6 Volt max output). The 100k resistor in the  circuit sketch should go directly to the V+batt, to monitor the battery voltage. The choice for the 100k resistor is explained here.  If for power efficiency you decide to use a bare ESP8266 instead, one has the opportunity to increase the resistors of the voltage divider to come to a smaller current through these resistors

Dimming an AC lamp via MQTT

Years ago I published a TRIAC dimmer that could be controlled by a simple microcontroller such as an arduino. Times have changed and right now it is of more importance to be able to control that lamp from a home automation system such as OpenHab, Homematic or NodeRed.

So, let’s have a look at the circuit first:
This is a rather classic circuit. It detects the zerocrossing on the grid and then a microcontroller ignites the TRIAC with a time delay that determines the brightness of the attached Lamp.  The full cycle is 10mS (at 50Hz)
A circuit like this is easy to make for very low cost (1-2 Euro).

However, if you shy away from soldering  such a circuit, there are ready made modules available as well:
You should not need to pay more than 3-4 USD for such a module. Anything above that is robbery

Software to control this dimmer would look something like this:


#include <Ethernet.h>
#include <PubSubClient.h>
#include  <TimerOne.h>

#define CLIENT_ID       "Dimmer"
#define PUBLISH_DELAY   3000

String ip = "";
bool startsend = HIGH;
uint8_t mac[6] = {0x00, 0x01, 0x02, 0x03, 0x04, 0x07};

volatile int i=0;               // Variable to use as a counter volatile as it is in an interrupt
volatile boolean zero_cross=0;  // Boolean to store a "switch" to tell us if we have crossed zero
int AC_pin1 = 4;// Output to Opto Triac
int dim1 = 0;// Dimming level (0-100)  0 = on, 100 = 0ff

int inc=1;          // counting up or down, 1=up, -1=down
int freqStep = 100; // make this 83 for 60Hz gridfrequency

EthernetClient ethClient;
PubSubClient mqttClient;
long previousMillis;

void zero_cross_detect() {    
  zero_cross = true;               // set the boolean to true to tell our dimming function that a zero cross has occured
  i=0;
  digitalWrite(AC_pin1, LOW);       // turn off TRIAC (and AC)
}                                 

// Turn on the TRIAC at the appropriate time
void dim_check() {                   
  if(zero_cross == true) {              
    if(i>=dim1) {                     
      digitalWrite(AC_pin1, HIGH); // turn on light       
      i=0;  // reset time step counter                         
      zero_cross = false; //reset zero cross detection
    } 
    else {
      i++; // increment time step counter                     
    }                                
  }                                  
} 

void setup() {
  
  attachInterrupt(0, zero_cross_detect, RISING);    // Attach an Interupt to Pin 2 (interupt 0) for Zero Cross Detection
  Timer1.initialize(freqStep);                      // Initialize TimerOne library for the freq we need
  Timer1.attachInterrupt(dim_check, freqStep);
  pinMode(4, OUTPUT);

  // setup serial communication

  Serial.begin(9600);
  while (!Serial) {};
  Serial.println(F("dimmer"));
  Serial.println();

  // setup ethernet communication using DHCP
  if (Ethernet.begin(mac) == 0) {
    Serial.println(F("Unable to configure Ethernet using DHCP"));
    for (;;);
  }

  Serial.println(F("Ethernet configured via DHCP"));
  Serial.print("IP address: ");
  Serial.println(Ethernet.localIP());
  Serial.println();

  ip = String (Ethernet.localIP()[0]);
  ip = ip + ".";
  ip = ip + String (Ethernet.localIP()[1]);
  ip = ip + ".";
  ip = ip + String (Ethernet.localIP()[2]);
  ip = ip + ".";
  ip = ip + String (Ethernet.localIP()[3]);
  //Serial.println(ip);

  // setup mqtt client
  mqttClient.setClient(ethClient);
  mqttClient.setServer( "192.168.1.103", 1883); // <= put here the address of YOUR MQTT server //Serial.println(F("MQTT client configured")); mqttClient.setCallback(callback); Serial.println(); Serial.println(F("Ready to send data")); previousMillis = millis(); mqttClient.publish("home/br/nb/ip", ip.c_str()); } void loop() { // it's time to send new data? if (millis() - previousMillis > PUBLISH_DELAY) {
  sendData();
  previousMillis = millis();

  }

  mqttClient.loop();
  Serial.print("dim1 in loop = ");
  Serial.println(dim1);
}

void sendData() {
  char msgBuffer[20];
  if (mqttClient.connect(CLIENT_ID)) {
    mqttClient.subscribe("home/br/sb");
    if (startsend) {
     
      mqttClient.publish("home/br/nb/ip", ip.c_str());
      startsend = LOW;
    }
  }
}

void callback(char* topic, byte* payload, unsigned int length) {
  char msgBuffer[20];
  
   payload[length] = '\0';            // terminate string with '0'
  String strPayload = String((char*)payload);  // convert to string
  Serial.print("strPayload =  ");
  Serial.println(strPayload); //can use this if using longer southbound topics
  Serial.print("Message arrived [");
  Serial.print(topic);
  Serial.print("] ");//MQTT_BROKER
  for (int i = 0; i < length; i++) {
    Serial.print((char)payload[i]);
  }
  Serial.println();
  Serial.println(payload[0]);

dim1=strPayload.toInt();

}

The value freqStep is usually set at 75 or 78 with this type of circuits, which allows for 128 steps of dimming at 50Hz gridfrequency. I have set the value here purposely to 100 allowing for only 100 steps, which is convenient for use in OpenHAB as  the slider goes from 0-100%.
The calculation is as follows:

50Hz
As we have two zerocrossings per sine wave, the frequency of zerocrossings is 100Hz. Therefore the period between two zerocrossings is 10mSec is 10000uS.
So if you want to have 100 levels of dimming the steps you need to take are 10000/100=100uS

60Hz
The frequency of zerocrossings is 120Hz, therefore the period between two zerocrossings is 8.3mS is 8300uS. So if you want to have 100 levels of dimming, the steps you need to take are 8300/100=83uS -> freqStep=83